Good Habits #23: Treat People Fairly

By | August 16, 2016

[August 16, 2016]  It’s been now a couple of months since I posted to my series on good habits for leaders.  Not to diminish their necessity for a successful leader, but I’ve just not got around to it with so much on my social calendar.  Today I deal with one of the more crucial daily habits that a leader must employ; treating people fairly.

Being fair means working with people in a just and consistent manner.  This is not always easy when people come with different needs and skills but it is incumbent that the leader make a concerted effort to do so.  Regardless of our rank, each soldier must adhere to the military’s uniform codes of morality and justice.  No one, regardless of leader position or political connections is exempt from any military rule or regulation.  This is the basis of fairness.

A leader who jumps to conclusions without having all the facts and follows up by making destructive decisions is destructive and a danger to all.  One of my friends from the U.S. Infantry Basic Course was accused of cheating on an exam because someone “turned him in.”  After an investigation the facts show that the accuser was jealous of my friend who had consistently embarrassed the accuser by being the top scorer in the military’s physical fitness tests.

A good leader checks all the facts and hears everyone out before passing judgment.  Often difficult since leaders work in an environment where facts are not always complete, but it remains crucial that any decision be based on as many facts and logic as reasonable at the time.  One will be known as a fair leader and that is what helps establish credibility with the workforce.

When people are treated fairly and, more importantly, when they feel they are being treated fairly, they reward that leader with loyalty, respect, and dedication.  Such is the epitome of leadership in the modern age.  A leader who shows fairness in the daily execution of their duties is more likely to be not just successful but given high praise and respect by those around that leader.

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Author: Douglas R. Satterfield

Hello. I'm Doug and I provide at least one article everyday on some leadership topic. I welcome comments and also guests who would like to write an article. Thanks for reading my blog.